Heat is No Friend to Your IP Traffic

LizardMy son owns a lizard. A leopard gecko, to be exact. His name is Larry. I’m not kidding. Larry the Lizard.

Larry lives inside a 10-gallon glass terrarium in my son’s bedroom. Larry eats live crickets, which I am forced to feed it when my son isn’t home. I’m not a fan. Obviously.

But that’s beside the point here. The point of this post is the lamps that rest on top of Larry’s tank. Well actually, the point of this post is PoE. But we’ll get to that.

Larry’s tank has two lamps on top of it. One is a 75W heat lamp, and the other is one of those 25W blue bulbs that’s supposed to simulate night time. You see, we need to switch the lamps on an off a couple times a day to optimize Larry’s lizard comfort. This thing requires more maintenance than my children, I swear.

Anyway, the other day I knocked the heat lamp over when I went to turn it off. In my haste to save it from falling, I grabbed the metal dome and burnt the heck out of my hand. If I were a normal person, I would’ve shouted a few choice words, righted the lamp, and moved on with my day.

But I’m not a normal person anymore; I’ve morphed into a cable nerd. And in true cable-nerd fashion, my brain went right to power and heat and cables. Specifically, I cursed the fact that they don’t make those lamps out of something that dissipates heat a little better!

My mind then jumped to the display we have in the TEK Center at Berk-Tek, where we demonstrate how much hotter regular Cat 5e cables get than LANmark-XTP cables get when you run power over them.

There’s no way around it: when you run power over copper conductors, you generate resistance. Resistance generates heat. More power = more heat. Heat is no friend to IP traffic. It weakens signal strength, which can lead to errors. Errors lead to a slow network, which leads to unhappy customers, employees and guests. Nobody wants that!

The key to successful deployment of PoE is to minimize that heat rise. Berk-Tek cables are specially made for this. Check out more here.